The Linux Foundation Announces New Linux on Azure Training Course



  • New online course will bring Azure pros up to speed with Linux, and vice versa

    SAN FRANCISCO, January 11, 2018The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of a new training course, LFS205 – Administering Linux on Azure.

    A large number of the virtual machines running in Azure are utilizing the Linux operating system. Both Linux and Azure professionals should make sure they know how to manage Linux workloads in an Azure environment as this trend is likely to continue. LFS205 provides an introduction to managing Linux on Azure. Whether someone is a Linux professional who wants to learn more about working on Azure, or an Azure professional that needs to understand how to work with Linux in Azure, this course will provide the requisite knowledge.

    John Gossman, Distinguished Engineer, Microsoft Azure, and Linux Foundation Board Member commented: “With over 40 percent of VMs on Azure now Linux, we are working closely with The Linux Foundation on a Linux on Azure course to make sure customers currently using Linux on Azure–and those who want to–have the tools and knowledge they need to run their enterprise workloads on our cloud. We look forward to continued collaboration with The Linux Foundation to continue to deliver trainings to make customers’ lives easier.”

    “As shown by The Linux Foundation and Dice’s Open Source Jobs Report, cloud computing skills are by far the most in demand by employers,” said Linux Foundation General Manager for Training & Certification, Clyde Seepersad. “This shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone, as the world today is run in the cloud. Azure is one of the most popular public clouds, and a huge portion of its instances run on Linux. That’s why we feel this new course is essential to give Azure professionals the Linux skills they need, give Linux professionals the Azure skills they need, and train new professionals to ensure industry has the talent it needs to meet the growing demand for Linux on Azure.”

    The course starts with an introduction to Linux and Azure, after which students will learn more about advanced Linux features and how they are managed in an Azure environment. Next, the course goes into information about managing containers, either in Linux or with the open source container technology that is integrated in Azure. After that, LFS205 covers how to deploy virtual machines in Azure, discussing different deployment scenarios. Once the VMs are available in Azure, students will need to know how to manage them in an efficient way, which is covered next. The last part of this course teaches how to troubleshoot Linux in Azure, and to monitor Linux in Azure using different open source tools.

    Students can expect to learn about:

    • Advanced Linux features and how they are managed in an Azure environment
    • Managing containers
    • Deploying virtual machines in Azure, and managing them
    • Monitoring and troubleshooting Linux in Azure

    LFS205 is taught by Sander van Vugt, a Linux professional living in the Netherlands and working for customers around the globe. Sander is an author of many Linux-related video courses and books, and instructor, as well as course developer for The Linux Foundation. He is also a managing partner of ITGilde, a large co-operative in which about a hundred independent Linux professionals in the Netherlands have joined forces.

    The course is available to begin immediately. The $299 course fee provides unlimited access to the course for one year to all content and labs. Interested individuals may enroll here.

    About The Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

    The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

    Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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    The post The Linux Foundation Announces New Linux on Azure Training Course appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/press-release/linux-foundation-announces-new-linux-azure-training-course/


 



Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
  • Make ISO from DVD

    In this case I had an OS install disk which was required to be on a virtual node with no optical drive, so I needed to transfer an image to the server to create a VM

    Find out which device the DVD is:

    lsblk

    Output:

    NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 465.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 1G 0 part /boot └─sda2 8:2 0 464.8G 0 part ├─centos-root 253:0 0 50G 0 lvm / ├─centos-swap 253:1 0 11.8G 0 lvm [SWAP] └─centos-home 253:2 0 403G 0 lvm /home sdb 8:16 1 14.5G 0 disk /mnt sr0 11:0 1 4.1G 0 rom /run/media/rick/CCSA_X64FRE_EN-US_DV5

    Therefore /dev/sr0 is the location , or disk to be made into an ISO

    I prefer simplicity, and sometimes deal with the fallout after the fact, however Ive repeated this countless times with success.

    dd if=/dev/sr0 of=win10.iso

    Where if=Input file and of=output file

    I chill out and do something else while the image is being copied/created, and the final output:

    8555456+0 records in 8555456+0 records out 4380393472 bytes (4.4 GB) copied, 331.937 s, 13.2 MB/s

    Fin!

    read more
  • Recreate postrgresql database template encode to ASCII

    UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate = FALSE WHERE datname = 'template1';

    Now we can drop it:

    DROP DATABASE template1;

    Create database from template0, with a new default encoding:

    CREATE DATABASE template1 WITH TEMPLATE = template0 ENCODING = 'UNICODE'; UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate = TRUE WHERE datname = 'template1'; \c template1 VACUUM FREEZE;

    read more
});