Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces Kubernetes® as First Graduated Project



  • C__ontainer orchestration system widely deployed at scale with numerous global organizations

    SONOMA, Calif., March 6, 2018 – Open Source Leadership Summit – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Kubernetes is the first project to graduate. To move from incubation to graduate, projects must demonstrate thriving adoption, a documented, structured governance process, and a strong commitment to community success and inclusivity.

    “Kubernetes led to the creation of the CNCF as the first project accepted by the Technical Operating Committee (TOC) a little over two years ago,” said Chris Aniszczyk, COO of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “With the project’s rapid growth, broad participation from numerous organizations, cloud providers and users, and proven ability to operate at scale, the TOC readily endorsed Kubernetes moving on from incubation to graduate. It signals that Kubernetes is mature as an open source project and resilient enough to manage containers at scale across any industry in companies of all sizes.”

    For more Kubernetes milestones and its tenure at CNCF, read this blog.

    Established, global organizations like Uber, Bloomberg, Blackrock, BlaBlaCar, The New York Times, Lyft, eBay, Buffer, Squarespace, Ancestry, GolfNow, Goldman Sachs and many others use Kubernetes in production at massive scale. Furthermore, according to Redmonk, 71 percent of the Fortune 100 use containers and more than 50 percent of Fortune 100 companies use Kubernetes as their container orchestration platform.

    To officially graduate from incubating status, the project also adopted the CNCF Code of Conduct, defined its own governance structure and established a Steering Committee. Today committers come from multiple companies and lists who has designated responsibility over different parts of the Kubernetes codebase.

    Additionally, Kubernetes also had to earn (and maintain) a Core Infrastructure Initiative Best Practices Badge. Completed in August of 2016, the CII badge shows an ongoing commitment to code quality and security best practices.

    “The Kubernetes project is proud to graduate into a full CNCF project as well as to have helped the organization launch and grow into the industry-leading position it has today. This project and company ecosystem has changed the face of infrastructure in the cloud. The Kubernetes community looks forward to maturing the impact cloud native development has had in the industry as a whole,” said Sarah Novotny, Open Source Strategy Lead, Google Cloud.

    “Kubernetes has become transcendent in its ability to shatter assumptions about what is possible in an open source project. Ascending from incubation to a full-fledged CNCF project puts the finishing touches on a lighthouse built with care to guide other communities toward conscientious success,” said Jaice Singer DuMars, Kubernetes Project Ambassador, Microsoft

    Availability and Oversight

    The open source container orchestration system includes apps, services, network storage, cluster management and performance and stability features. Kubernetes is released under the Apache License v2.0 and is overseen by a self-selected team of active contributors to the project. The 13-person Steering Committee guides the project’s day-to-day management, including community development and technical processes. For downloads, documentation, and how to get involved, visit https://github.com/kubernetes, https://kubernetes.io/ and https://twitter.com/kubernetesio.

    Additional Resources

    About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

    The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

    Media Contact

    Natasha Woods

    The Linux Foundation

    (415) 312-5289

    PR@CNCF.io

    The post Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces Kubernetes® as First Graduated Project appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/cloud-containers-virtualization/cloud-native-computing-foundation-announces-kubernetes-first-graduated-project/





Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
  • Make ISO from DVD

    In this case I had an OS install disk which was required to be on a virtual node with no optical drive, so I needed to transfer an image to the server to create a VM

    Find out which device the DVD is:

    lsblk

    Output:

    NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 465.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 1G 0 part /boot └─sda2 8:2 0 464.8G 0 part ├─centos-root 253:0 0 50G 0 lvm / ├─centos-swap 253:1 0 11.8G 0 lvm [SWAP] └─centos-home 253:2 0 403G 0 lvm /home sdb 8:16 1 14.5G 0 disk /mnt sr0 11:0 1 4.1G 0 rom /run/media/rick/CCSA_X64FRE_EN-US_DV5

    Therefore /dev/sr0 is the location , or disk to be made into an ISO

    I prefer simplicity, and sometimes deal with the fallout after the fact, however Ive repeated this countless times with success.

    dd if=/dev/sr0 of=win10.iso

    Where if=Input file and of=output file

    I chill out and do something else while the image is being copied/created, and the final output:

    8555456+0 records in 8555456+0 records out 4380393472 bytes (4.4 GB) copied, 331.937 s, 13.2 MB/s

    Fin!

    read more
  • Recreate postrgresql database template encode to ASCII

    UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate = FALSE WHERE datname = 'template1';

    Now we can drop it:

    DROP DATABASE template1;

    Create database from template0, with a new default encoding:

    CREATE DATABASE template1 WITH TEMPLATE = template0 ENCODING = 'UNICODE'; UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate = TRUE WHERE datname = 'template1'; \c template1 VACUUM FREEZE;

    read more
});