SDN Trends: The Business Benefits and Emerging SD-WAN Technology



  • SD-WAN

    Shunmin Zhu, Head of Alibaba Cloud Network Services, offers insights on the future of Software Defined Networking (SDN) and the emerging SD-WAN technology.

    The 2018 Open Networking Summit is rapidly approaching. In anticipation of this event, we spoke to Shunmin Zhu, Head of Alibaba Cloud Network Services to get more insights on two of the hot topics that will be discussed at the event: the future of Software Defined Networking (SDN) and the emerging SD-WAN technology.

    “SDN is a network design approach beyond just a technology protocol. The core idea is decoupling the forwarding plane from the control plane and management plane. In this way, network switches and routers only focus on packet forwarding,” said Zhu.

    “The forwarding policies and rules are centrally managed by a controller. From a cloud service provider’s perspective, SDN enables customers to manage their private networks in a more intelligent manner through API.”

    This newfound approach to networks that were previously thought to be nearly unfathomable black boxes brings welcome transparency and flexibility. And, that naturally leads to more innovation such as SD-WAN and Hybrid-WAN.

    Zhu shared more information on both of those cutting-edge developments later in this interview. Here is what he had to say about how all these things come together to shape the future of the networking.

    Linux.com: Please tell us a little more about SDN for the benefit of readers who may not be familiar with it.

    Shunmin Zhu: Today, cloud services make it very convenient for a user to buy a virtual machine, set up the VM, change the configurations at any time, and choose the most suitable billing method. SDN offers the flexibility of using network products the same way as using a VM. Such degree of flexibility was not seen in networks before the advent of SDN.

    Before, it was unlikely for a user to divide his cloud network into several private subnets. In the SDN era, however, with VPC (Virtual Private Cloud) users are able to customize their cloud networks by choosing the private subnets and dividing them further. In short, SDN puts the power of cloud network self-management into the hands of users.

    Linux.com: What were the drivers behind the development of SDN? What are the drivers spurring its adoption now?

    Zhu: Traditional networks prior to SDN find it hard to support the rapid development of business applications. The past few decades witnessed fast growth in the computing industry but not so much innovation was seen in the networking sector. With emerging trends, such as cloud computing and virtualization, organizations need their networks to become as flexible as the cloud computing and storage resources in order to respond to IT and business requirements. Meanwhile the hardware, operating system, and network application of the traditional network are tightly coupled and not accessible to an outsider. The three components are usually controlled by the same OEM. Any innovation or update is thus heavily dependent on the device OEMs.

    The shortcomings of the traditional network are apparent from a user’s perspective. First and foremost is the speed of delivery. Network capacity extension usually takes several months, and even a simple network configuration could take several days, which is hard for customers to accept today.

    From the perspective of an Internet Service Provider (ISP), the traditional network could hardly satisfy the need of their customers. Additionally, heterogeneous network devices from multiple vendors complicate network management. There’s little that ISPs could do to improve the situation as the network functions are controlled by the device OEMs. User and carrier’s urgent need for SDN has made this technology popular. In a large extent, SDN overcomes the heterogeneity of the physical network devices and opens up network functions via APIs. Business applications can call APIs to turn on network services on demand, which is revolutionary in the network industry.

    Linux.com: What are the business benefits overall?

    Zhu: The benefits of SDN are twofold. On the one hand, it helps to reduce cost, increase productivity, and reuse the network resources. SDN makes the use of networking products and services very easy and flexible. It gives users the option to pay by usage or by duration. The cost reduction and productivity boost empowers the users to invest more time and money into core business and application innovations. SDN also increases the reuse of the overall network resources in an organization.

    On the other hand, SDN brings new innovations and business opportunities to the networking industry. SDN technology is fundamentally reshaping networking toward a more open and prosperous ecosystem. Traditionally, only a few network device manufacturers and ISPs were the major players in the networking industry. With the arrival of SDN, more participants are encouraged to create new networking applications and services, generating tons of new business opportunities.

    Linux.com: Why is SDN gaining in popularity now?

    Zhu: SDN is gaining momentum because it brings revolutionary changes and tremendous business value to the networking industry. The rise of cloud computing is another factor that accelerates the adoption of SDN. The cloud computing network offers the perfect usage scenario for SDN to quickly land as a real-world application. The vast scale, large scope, and various needs of the cloud network pose a big challenge to the traditional network. SDN technology works very well with cloud computing in terms of elasticity. SDN virtualizes the underlay physical network to provide richer and more customized services to the vast number of cloud computing users.

    Linux.com: What are future trends in SDN and the emerging SD-WAN technology?

    Zhu: First of all, I think SDN will be adopted in more networking usage scenarios. Most of the future networks will be designed by the rule of SDN. In addition to cloud computing data centers, WAN, carrier networks, campus networks, and even wireless networks will increasingly embrace the adoption of SDN.

    Secondly, network infrastructure based on SDN will further combine the power of hardware and software. By definition, SDN is software defined network. The technology seems to be prone to the software side. On the flipside, SDN cannot leave the physical network devices upon which it builds the virtual network. The difficulty to improve performance is another disadvantage of a pure software-based solution. In my vision, SDN technology will evolve towards a tighter combination with hardware.

    The more powerful next generation network will be built upon the mutually reinforcing software and hardware. Some cloud service providers have already started to use SmartNIC as a core component in their SDN solution for performance boost.

    The next trend is the rapid development of SDN-based network applications. SDN helps build an open industry environment. It’s a good time for technology companies to start businesses around innovative network applications such as network monitoring, network analytics, cyber security and NFV (Network Function Virtualization).

    SD-WAN is the application of SDN technology in the wide area network (WAN) space. Generally speaking, WAN refers to a communications network that connects multiple remote local area networks (LANs) with a distance of tens to thousands of miles to each other. For example, a corporate WAN may connect the networks of its headquarters, branch offices, and cloud service providers. Traditional WAN solutions, such as MPLS, could be expensive and require a long period before service provisioning. Wireless networks, on the other hand, fall short in bandwidth capacity and stability. The invention of SD-WAN fixes these problems to a large extent.

    For instance, a company can build its corporate WAN by connecting branch offices to the headquarters via virtual dedicated line and internet, also known as a Hybrid-WAN solution. The Internet link brings convenience to network connections between the branches to the headquarters while the virtual dedicated line guarantees the quality of the network service. The Hybrid-WAN solution balances cost, efficiency, and quality in creating a corporate WAN. Other benefits of SD-WAN include SLA, QoS, and application-aware routing rules – key applications are tagged and prioritized in network communication for a better performance. With these benefits, SD-WAN is getting increasing attention and popularity.

    Linux.com: What kind of user experience do you think is expected regarding SDN products and services?

    Zhu: There are three things that are most important to SDN user experience. First is the simplicity. Networking technologies and products sometimes impress users as over complicated and hard to manage. The SDN network products should be radically simplified. Even a user with limited knowledge in networking should be able to use and configure the product.

    Second is the intelligence. SDN network products should be smart enough to identify incidents and fix the issues by itself. This will minimize the impact to the customer’s business and reduce the management costs.

    The third most important thing is the transparency. The network is the underlying infrastructure to all applications. The lack of transparency sometimes makes users feel that their network is a black box. A successful SDN product should give more transparency to the network administrators and other network users.

    This article was sponsored by Alibaba and written by Linux.com.

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    The post SDN Trends: The Business Benefits and Emerging SD-WAN Technology appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog/sdn-trends-the-business-benefits-and-emerging-sd-wan-technology/





Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
  • Open Source Summit

    Join us in Edinburgh! Submit a proposal to speak by July 1 for Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

    Submit a proposal to speak at Open Source Summit Europe & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, taking place October 22-24, 2018, in Edinburgh, UK, and share your knowledge and expertise with 2,000+ open source technologists and community leaders. Proposals are being accepted through 11:59pm PDT, Sunday, July 1.

    This year’s tracks and content will cover the following areas at Open Source Summit Europe:

    Cloud Native Apps/Serverless/Microservices Infrastructure & Automation (Cloud/Cloud Native/DevOps) Linux Systems Artificial Intelligence & Data Analytics Emerging Technologies & Wildcard (Networking, Edge, IoT, Hardware, Blockchain) Community, Compliance, Governance, Culture, Open Source Program Management (Open Collaboration Conference track) Diversity & Inclusion (Diversity Empowerment Summit) Innovation at Apache/Apache Projects TODO / Open Source Program Management

    View the full list of suggested topics for Open Source Summit Europe.

    Suggested Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Topics:

    Audio, Video, Streaming Media and Graphics Security System Size, Boot Speed Real-Time Linux – Performance, Tuning and Mainlining SDKs for Embedded Products Flash Memory Devices and Filesystems Build Systems, Embedded Distributions and Development Tools Linux in Devices such as Mobile Phones, DVRs, TVs, Cameras, etc Use of Linux in Automotive Drones and Robots Linux in the Internet of Things Practical Experiences and War Stories Standards Public Infrastructure Industrial Automation

    This year’s tracks and content will cover the following areas at ELC:

    Suggested OpenIoT Summit Topics:

    Real-Time OS (Zephyr, RIOT, MyNewt, FreeRTOS, NuttX, mbed and Others) Outside World Meets IoT (Sensor Interaction, Low Footprint, Connected Sensors, EMF/RFI Impact) Bootloaders, Firmware & Updates Containers Distributed Edge Application Technologies On-device Analytics Blockchain for Constrained Devices Device Management Power Management Configuration Management Developing for Security Safety Considerations Certifications – Lessons Learned Taking Devices to Product

    View the full list of suggested topics for ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

    SUBMIT FOR OPEN SOURCE SUMMIT EUROPE »SUBMIT FOR ELC + OPENIOT SUMMIT EUROPE »

    Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit Europe and ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe:

    Register & Save

    Not submitting, but plan to attend? Register before August 18 and save $300 with early bird pricing. One registration gets you access to both Open Source Summit Europe & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

    Interested in Sponsoring?

    Showcase your thought leadership among a vibrant open source community and connect with top influencers driving today’s technology purchasing decisions. Learn how to become a sponsor of Open Source Summit Europe or ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

    The post Last Chance to Speak at Open Source Summit and ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe – Submit by July 1 appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog/last-chance-to-speak-at-open-source-summit-and-elc-openiot-summit-europe-submit-by-july-1/

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  • Open Source Guides

    The Open Source Guides for the Enterprise are now available in Chinese.

    The popular Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, developed by The Linux Foundation in collaboration with the TODO Group, are now available in Chinese. This set of guides provides industry-proven best practices to help organizations successfully leverage open source.

    “Making these resources available to Chinese audiences in their native language will encourage even greater adoption of and participation with open source projects,” said Chris Aniszczyk, CTO of Cloud Native Computing Foundation and co-founder of the TODO Group. The guides span various stages of the open source project lifecycle, from initial planning and formation to winding down a project.

    The 10 guides now available in Mandarin include topics such as:

    Creating an Open Source Program by Chris Aniszczyk, Cloud Native Computing Foundation; Jeff McAffer, Microsoft; Will Norris, Google; and Andrew Spyker, Netflix Using Open Source Code by Ibrahim Haddad, Samsung Research America Participating in Open Source Communities by Stormy Peters, Red Hat; and Nithya Ruff, Comcast Recruiting Open Source Developers by Guy Martin, Autodesk; Jeff Osier-Mixon, Intel Corporation; Nithya Ruff; and Gil Yehuda, Oath Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success by Christine Abernathy, Facebook; Chris Aniszczyk; Joe Beda, Heptio; Sarah Novotny, Google; and Gil Yehuda

    The translated guides were launched at the LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China conference in Beijing, where The Linux Foundation also welcomed Chinese Internet giant Tencent as a Platinum Member.

    The post Open Source Guides for the Enterprise Now Available in Chinese appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog/open-source-guides-for-the-enterprise-now-available-in-chinese/

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