Case Study: LF Networking (LFN) Projects Power Next Generation Orange Networks



  • Case Study: LF Networking (LFN) Projects Power Next Generation Orange Networks

    Orange is a leading telecommunications company with headquarters in France. It boasts 273M customers worldwide, 152,000 employees and a revenue of :undefined:€:undefined:41B (2017). They are the largest telecoms operator in France, with the bulk of their operations in Europe, Africa and the Middle East.

    Orange has an ambitious, forward-looking strategy fueled by research and innovation and has announced 5G trials in France for 2018 and aims to deliver an operational 5G network by 2020. ONAP, OPNFV and ODL are critical components of Orange:undefined:’:undefined:s next generation SDN/NFV initiatives to enable 5G, big data, AI and IoT network services.

    :undefined:“:undefined:At Orange, we are using open source to speed up the industrialisation (hardening) of technology and ensuring open APIs :undefined:—:undefined: to help us partner and create new opportunities to deliver a better customer experience. LFN projects help solve some of the challenges that come with SDN/NFV by reducing the time and effort required for network transformation, specifically in the areas of simplified and automated operations, NFV Infrastructure/VNF validation and onboarding, network service design/onboarding and interoperability.:undefined:”:undefined:
    :undefined:–:undefined: Jehanne Savi, Executive Leader of the All-IP and On-demand Networks Programmes

    READ MORE

    The postCase Study: LF Networking (LFN) Projects Power Next Generation Orange Networks appeared first onThe Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/lfn-resource/case-study-lf-networking-lfn-projects-power-next-generation-orange-networks/


 



  • Make ISO from DVD

    In this case I had an OS install disk which was required to be on a virtual node with no optical drive, so I needed to transfer an image to the server to create a VM

    Find out which device the DVD is:

    lsblk

    Output:

    NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 465.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 1G 0 part /boot └─sda2 8:2 0 464.8G 0 part ├─centos-root 253:0 0 50G 0 lvm / ├─centos-swap 253:1 0 11.8G 0 lvm [SWAP] └─centos-home 253:2 0 403G 0 lvm /home sdb 8:16 1 14.5G 0 disk /mnt sr0 11:0 1 4.1G 0 rom /run/media/rick/CCSA_X64FRE_EN-US_DV5

    Therefore /dev/sr0 is the location , or disk to be made into an ISO

    I prefer simplicity, and sometimes deal with the fallout after the fact, however Ive repeated this countless times with success.

    dd if=/dev/sr0 of=win10.iso

    Where if=Input file and of=output file

    I chill out and do something else while the image is being copied/created, and the final output:

    8555456+0 records in 8555456+0 records out 4380393472 bytes (4.4 GB) copied, 331.937 s, 13.2 MB/s

    Fin!

    read more
  • Recreate postrgresql database template encode to ASCII

    UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate = FALSE WHERE datname = 'template1';

    Now we can drop it:

    DROP DATABASE template1;

    Create database from template0, with a new default encoding:

    CREATE DATABASE template1 WITH TEMPLATE = template0 ENCODING = 'UNICODE'; UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate = TRUE WHERE datname = 'template1'; \c template1 VACUUM FREEZE;

    read more
});