The Linux Foundation Announces Four Networking Training Courses



  • Online courses, available on edX.org and The Linux Foundation training platform, provide introductory and advanced knowledge of ONAP and OPNFV

    LOS ANGELES (Open Networking Summit), March 27, 2018The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of four new training courses, LFS163x: Introduction to ONAP: Complete Network Automation and, LFS164x: NFV Acceleration: An Introduction to OPNFV, both available on edX.org, the leading nonprofit learning platform founded by Harvard and MIT; and LFS263: ONAP Fundamentals, and LFS264: OPNFV Fundamentals, available on The Linux Foundation training platform. All courses are available and open for enrollment today.

    Open source networking projects are transforming how service providers and enterprises develop, deploy, and scale their networks and next-generation services. The 2017 Open Source Jobs Report from The Linux Foundation and Dice found nearly half of hiring managers are looking to hire individuals with networking expertise, and 55 percent report that formal training or certifications is a priority when choosing new hires.

    LFS163x: Introduction to ONAP: Complete Network Automation is designed to provide a high-level understanding and business perspective of the ONAP project and a guide for navigating, participating, and benefiting from the ONAP community. The course is also meant for vendors who wish to determine how to position or sell their products into the ONAP ecosystem. The course outline includes:

    • Chapter 1. NFV Basics and ONAP Introduction
    • Chapter 2. ONAP Scope and Key Concepts
    • Chapter 3. ONAP Architecture
    • Chapter 4. Official ONAP Projects
    • Chapter 5. ONAP Demos and Getting Involved
    • Final Exam

    LFS164x: NFV Acceleration: An Introduction to OPNFV offers an introduction to The Linux Foundation OPNFV project (Open Platform for NFV), providing the basics of NFV. It delves into the challenges OPNFV solves, with an overview of related projects and industry use cases. We will also discuss how you can benefit from OPNFV. The course outline includes:

    • Chapter 1. NFV Basics and OPNFV Introduction
    • Chapter 2. Upstream Projects Integration
    • Chapter 3. Feature Projects
    • Chapter 4. Integration Projects
    • Chapter 5. Testing Projects
    • Chapter 6. Use Cases and Getting Involved
    • Final Exam

    LFS263: ONAP Fundamentals is designed to provide a fundamental understanding and basic hands-on knowledge of the ONAP project and a guide for navigating, participating, and benefiting from the ONAP community. The course includes lab exercises to run on the Google Cloud Platform for a deeper learning of each of ONAP’s functional areas. The course outline includes:

    • Chapter 1. Introduction to Network Function Virtualization
    • Chapter 2. ONAP Scope and Key Concepts
    • Chapter 3. ONAP Architecture
      • Lab 1. ONAP Deployment using OOM and OPNFV
    • Chapter 4. ONAP Subprojects
      • Lab 2. Virtual firewall (vFW) network service design
    • Chapter 5. ONAP Use Cases
      • Lab 3. vFW network service runtime
      • Lab 4. vFW closed-loop automation

    LFS264: OPNFV Fundamentals introduces students to the fundamentals of OPNFV. Starting with an overview of NFV and OPNFV, it delves into the challenges OPNFV solves, then provides an overview of the feature, integration, and testing OPNFV projects, industry use cases and benefits. In addition to the theoretical learning, the course includes lab exercises to run on the Google Cloud Platform. These lab exercises revolve around deployment and testing, for a deeper learning of each of OPNFV’s key areas. The course outline includes:

    • Chapter 1. Introduction to NFV and OPNFV
    • Chapter 2. Upstream Projects Integration
    • Chapter 3. Feature Projects
    • Chapter 4. Integration Projects
      • Lab 1. Deploying OPNFV
    • Chapter 5. Testing Projects
      • Lab 2. Running Functest
      • Lab 3. Running Yardstick
    • Chapter 6. OPNFV Use Cases

    “With networking becoming increasingly important to a wider range of organizations than ever before, and traditional proprietary solutions being replaced with open source software, there is huge demand for more professionals with expertise in this area of technology,” said Linux Foundation General Manager, Networking Arpit Joshipura. “These new training courses will help build a new generation of networking professionals, and ensure existing professionals have the skills needed to succeed in a changing environment.”

    LFS163x and LFS164x are available to begin immediately on edX.org. There is no charge for these introductory courses, though a verified certificate of completion is available for $99. LFS263 and LFS264 are now open for pre-enrollment, with the courses being fully available in May. Those who purchase either course during the pre-enrollment period can do so for a discounted fee of $99 each ($199 standard).

    About The Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

    The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

    Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

    # # #

    The post The Linux Foundation Announces Four Networking Training Courses appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/press-release/the-linux-foundation-announces-four-networking-training-courses/





Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
  • Use the same script for updating/ upgrading

    Make sure to change the versions to the latest releases:

    #!/bin/bash set -e bpcver=4.2.1 bpcxsver=0.57 rsyncbpcver=3.0.9.12

    Scroll through the script, know what you are doing.

    Uncomment the upgrade section(s) and comment out the install section(s)

    read more
  • Again running smartctl after all is said and done:

    smartctl --all /dev/sda

    ddrescue-smartctl-after-rescue.png ddrescue-smartctl-2.png

    Yet an old drive in itself, I run the wheels off of them, and monitor regularly as anyone should.

    read more
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