Civil Infrastructure Platform Announces Collaboration with the Debian LTS Initiative and Welcomes Cybertrust as a New Member



  • CIP aims to create an interoperable open source software platform that is secure, reliable and sustainable for more than 10 years

    TOKYO, JAPAN – June 20, 2018 – The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) Project, which aims to provide a base layer of industrial grade open source software components, tools and methods to enable long-term management of critical systems, today announced a new collaboration with the Debian LTS Initiative to use Debian, the universal operating system that is available to developers & companies as free, open source software. This collaboration builds upon CIP’s mission of creating an open source framework that provides the software foundation needed to deliver essential services for civil infrastructure and economic development on a global scale.

    In this new partnership, CIP will specifically help with Debian Long Term Support (LTS), which aims to extend the lifetime of all Debian stable releases to more than 5 years. CIP will work with Freexian, a multi-faceted services company that is leading the effort for Debian LTS, to maximize interoperability, security and LTS for open source software for embedded systems.

    CIP will contribute in several ways, including:

    • Funding for Debian LTS activities
    • Working toward interoperability by harmonizing software and other elements
    • Collaborating on common elements

    “CIP’s mission of creating industrial grade open source software aligns with our goal of developing a free and universal operating system,” said Chris Lamb, Debian Project Leader. “We are excited about this collaboration as well as the CIP’s support of the Debian LTS project which aims to extend the support lifetime to more than five years. Together, we are committed to long term support for our users and laying the ‘foundation’ for the cities of the future.”

    CIP has had a long history of working with Debian as most control systems for transportation, power plants, healthcare and telecommunications run on Debian embedded systems.

    Hosted by The Linux Foundation, CIP aims to speed implementation of Linux-based civil infrastructure systems, build upon existing open source foundations and expertise, establish de facto standards by providing a base layer reference implementation, and contribute to and influence upstream projects regarding industrial needs. This collaboration with Debian will help CIP get one step closer to achieving their goals of providing long term support for critical systems through industrial grade software and a universal operating system.

    A Growing Ecosystem

    In addition to the new collaboration with Debian, CIP also welcomes Cybertrust Japan Co, Ltd. as a new Silver member. By joining CIP, Cybertrust, a company that supplies enterprise Linux operating systems, advances its commitment to building secure and reliable embedded equipment and systems.

    “Linux industrial or automotive-grade embedded systems are exposed to serious security threats and our customers expect long term Linux security patches,” said Tatsuo Ito, Vice President, and CTO for Cybertrust. “CIP has this expertise and shares the same goals as we do. We believe that together, we can address these critical issues.”

    Cybertrust joins other industry leaders, such as Codethink, Hitachi, Moxa, Plat’Home, Renesas, Siemens and Toshiba, in their work to create a reliable and secure Linux-based embedded software platform that is sustainable for decades to come.

    “The CIP Project continues to achieve milestones to build an interoperable open source platform that is secure, reliable and sustainable for more than 10 years,” said Urs Gleim, Head of the Central Smart Embedded Systems Group at Siemens and CIP Governing Board Chair. “We are thrilled that Cybertrust has joined CIP and will provide expertise in security and digital authentication based on Server Linux Distributor (Asianux) and their OTA implementations.”

    Open Source Summit Japan

    CIP will be at The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit Japan from June 20 – 22, 2018. The project will have a booth in the sponsor showcase and interactive demos from Hitachi, Plat’home and Renesas. CIP leaders will also be on-site to answer questions, discuss the importance of industrial grade open source software and how it impacts the city of the future. Additionally, CIP has two speaking sessions including a CIP introduction and overview for the CIP Kernel Maintenance. For more details about those sessions, click here.

    Additional CIP Resources:

    About CIP

    The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) is an open source project hosted by The Linux Foundation. The project is focused on establishing an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of reusable software building blocks that meet the safety, reliability and other requirements of industrial and civil infrastructure. For additional information, visit https://www.cip-project.org/.

    The post Civil Infrastructure Platform Announces Collaboration with the Debian LTS Initiative and Welcomes Cybertrust as a New Member appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/press-release/civil-infrastructure-platform-announces-collaboration-with-the-debian-lts-initiative-and-welcomes-cybertrust-as-a-new-member/





Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
});