California Police and Civil Liberties Groups Agreed on a Simple Transparency Measure. Gov. Brown Vetoed It Anyway.



  • California Gov. Jerry Brown used the weekend to veto one of 2017’s last remaining bills to shine light on police practices.

    S.B. 345 was pretty straightforward: every law enforcement agency would have to upload its policies and training materials to its public website—but only documents that would be available anyway under the California Public Records Act (CPRA). The bill had uncommon support from both law enforcement associations and civil liberties organizations, like EFF and the ACLU of California.

    Some of S.B. 345’s supporters. Source: Senate Analysis

    So why did Brown veto it?

    “The bill is too broad in scope and vaguely drafted. I appreciate the author’s desire for additional transparency of police practices and local law enforcement procedures, but I believe this goal can be accomplished with a more targeted and precise approach,” he wrote in his rejection letter [PDF].

    We’re not quite sure what he’s talking about. The bill was elegant and short and specified exactly what documents it applied to: “current standards, policies, practices, operating procedures, and education and training materials that would otherwise be available to the public if a request was made pursuant to the California Public Records Act.” If he has a better idea, we’d love to hear it.

    S.B. 345 was the last of a series of failures by California leadership to enhance government transparency this session.

    The legislature failed to pass S.B. 21, which would have more narrowly shined light on just surveillance technologies. Lawmakers also gutted a measure to penalize agencies that intentionally and improperly stymie public records requests. Yet, lawmakers somehow found the will to pass legislation to exempt even more documents from CPRA. And now that Brown has signed A.B. 492, independent companies that market public record research will have to include about as many disclosures and disclaimers as a pharmaceutical company advertising prescription drugs.

    Californians deserve much better. The sun should shine as brightly on our government as it does on our beaches.

    Along with the other transparency measures that fell short this session, we mourn the death of S.B. 345. We thank its sponsor, Sen. Steven Bradford, and all the transparency allies who urged the governor to sign this bill.


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Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
  • FYI for FreeBSD the driver only supports block size chunks, therefore:

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