iperf test



  • iPerf3 from iPerf.fr:

    • iPerf3 is a tool for active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. It supports tuning of various parameters related to timing, buffers and protocols (TCP, UDP, SCTP with IPv4 and IPv6).

    • For each test it reports the bandwidth, loss, and other parameters. This is a new implementation that shares no code with the original iPerf and also is not backwards compatible.

    • iPerf was orginally developed by NLANR/DAST. iPerf3 is principally developed by ESnet / Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is released under a three-clause BSD license.

    Install iperf Debian

    apt-get install iperf3
    

    Starting a local server is not necessary if testing to a remote server.

    Example test server:

    iperf -c ping.online.net -i 2 -t 20 -r
    

    Start iperf server

    To start Iperf in server mode, use the below command.

    iperf -s
    

    Start server in daemon mode

    Running the server without daemon mode keeps the process running in the terminal. Use the -D switch to run it as a daemon in the background.

    iperf -s -D
    

    Connecting to server from client

    Iperf needs to run on the local host in client mode, as well as in server mode on the remote host. To connect to the remote host, add it’s IP address after the -c switch.

    iperf -c <ip or host/domain name>
    

    Bi-directional simultaneous (test the speed both ways at the same time)

    Use the -d switch to test in the network bandwidth in both directions. This will perform two tests; one from local host to remote host, and another from the remote host to the local host.

    iperf -c <ip or host/domain name> -d
    

    Bi-directional testing (test the speed both one after another)

    Use the -r switch to test in the network bandwidth in both directions. This is similar to -d except the tests will be performed in sequence; first from local host to remote host, and another from the remote host to the local host.

    iperf -c <ip or host/domain name> -r
    

    Change the window size

    The TCP window size can be changed using the -w switch followed by the number of bytes to use. the below example shows a window size of 2KB. This can be used on either the server or the client.

    iperf -c <ip or host/domain name> -w 2048
    
    iperf -s -w 2048
    

    Change the port

    You must use the same port on both the client and the server for the two processes to communicate with each other. Use the -p switch followed by the port number to use on both the local and remote host.

    iperf -c <ip or host/domain name> -p 9000
    
    iperf -s -p 9000
    

    Change the test duration

    The default test duration of Iperf is 10 seconds. You can override the default with the -t switch followed by the time in seconds the test should last.

    iperf -s -t 60
    

    UDP instead of TCP

    The default protocol for Iperf to use is TCP. You can change this to UDP with the -u switch. You will need to run both the client and server in UDP mode to perform the tests.

    iperf -s -u
    iperf -c -u
    

    The result will have an extra metric for the packet loss which should be as low as possible, otherwise the packets will have to be re-transmitted using more bandwidth.


    Run multiple threads

    Iperf can spawn multiple threads to simultaneously send and receive data. Use the -P switch followed by the number of threads to use.

    iperf -c -P 4
    

    Check the version of Iperf

    Use the -v switch to see the version of Iperf you have installed.

    iperf -v
    

    See the full list of arguments

    Use the -h switch to see the full list of arguments supported by Iperf.

    iperf -h
    

    A nice list of iPerf servers can be found at iPerf.fr





Tmux Commands

screen and tmux

A comparison of the features (or more-so just a table of notes for accessing some of those features) for GNU screen and BSD-licensed tmux.

The formatting here is simple enough to understand (I would hope). ^ means ctrl+, so ^x is ctrl+x. M- means meta (generally left-alt or escape)+, so M-x is left-alt+x

It should be noted that this is no where near a full feature-set of either group. This - being a cheat-sheet - is just to point out the most very basic features to get you on the road.

Trust the developers and manpage writers more than me. This document is originally from 2009 when tmux was still new - since then both of these programs have had many updates and features added (not all of which have been dutifully noted here).

Action tmux screen
start a new session tmux OR
tmux new OR
tmux new-session
screen
re-attach a detached session tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen-r
re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR
tmux attach-session -d
screen -dr
re-attach an attached session (keeping it attached elsewhere) tmux attach OR
tmux attach-session
screen -x
detach from currently attached session ^b d OR
^b :detach
^a ^d OR
^a :detach
rename-window to newname ^b , <newname> OR
^b :rename-window <newn>
^a A <newname>
list windows ^b w ^a w
list windows in chooseable menu ^a "
go to window # ^b # ^a #
go to last-active window ^b l ^a ^a
go to next window ^b n ^a n
go to previous window ^b p ^a p
see keybindings ^b ? ^a ?
list sessions ^b s OR
tmux ls OR
tmux list-sessions
screen -ls
toggle visual bell ^a ^g
create another window ^b c ^a c
exit current shell/window ^d ^d
split window/pane horizontally ^b " ^a S
split window/pane vertically ^b % ^a |
switch to other pane ^b o ^a <tab>
kill the current pane ^b x OR (logout/^D)
collapse the current pane/split (but leave processes running) ^a X
cycle location of panes ^b ^o
swap current pane with previous ^b {
swap current pane with next ^b }
show time ^b t
show numeric values of panes ^b q
toggle zoom-state of current pane (maximize/return current pane) ^b z
break the current pane out of its window (to form new window) ^b !
re-arrange current panels within same window (different layouts) ^b [space]
Kill the current window (and all panes within) ^b killw [target-window]
  • Mount NFS from Truenas

    mkdir -p /media/rick/pool1 chown -R rick:rick /media/rick/pool1

    Add the automount to: /etc/fstab

    truenas.thecave:/mnt/pool1 /media/rick/pool1 nfs user,auto 0 0

    Retstart Nautilus to see the share in files:

    killall nautilus

    For other shares, just repeat the same process under directory ‘media’ with the name of the share substituted

    read more
  • Again running smartctl after all is said and done:

    smartctl --all /dev/sda

    ddrescue-smartctl-after-rescue.png ddrescue-smartctl-2.png

    Yet an old drive in itself, I run the wheels off of them, and monitor regularly as anyone should.

    read more
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